This is a great article in The Guardian on the effects of Geo Thermal on water quality in New Mexico.

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2019/mar/26/new-mexico-energy-geothermal-water-environment

I wrote about the release of GM mosquitos when they started the first trial in the Cayman Islands about 8 years ago.

Mosquitos are pollinators too

After we posted that article we kept track of what was happening.

In 2015 Genewatch UK published an article titled GM insect factories might become antibiotic-resistant bacteria factories. Their concern was mass production of GM insects in factories, using tetracyclines as an additive in their feed, could lead to drug resistance in their microbiota, in the same way that treating bees with tetracyclines has selected for antibiotic resistance. Oxitec’s GM insects may then disseminate antibiotic resistance when released into the environment in the repeated, largescale releases needed to vastly outnumber wild pest insect numbers.

This is a big deal – the World Health Organization (WHO) estimates 700,000 people die each year from antibiotic resistant bacterial infections.

Then just as Florida was thinking of releasing the GM mosquitos Physicians from the area expressed their concerns: These GM insects are programmed to require tetracycline as a maturation factor. If they do not receive the antibiotic in sufficient dosage to penetrate every cell and neutralize the implanted lethal gene, the insects die in early larval stage. If they receive a sufficient dosage, they will live and reproduce.

They asked that nasal swab studies be done to assess pre and post release bacterial resistance.  According to one of the doctors involved the company continued to spend big money marketing the concept but did not run the cheap cultures to soothe residents fears. Physicians Vote No To GM Mosquitos

In January 2017 in the Cayman Islands Oxitec announced The release of some 8 million modified mosquitoes in West Bay has had a significant impact in reducing populations of the disease spreading insects.

In June 2017

In  October 2017 a report was released identifying the success of the project claiming a 62% suppression rate.

An $8 million plan for an island wide rollout of the genetically modified mosquito program was aborted at the last minute in late 2017 amid budget cuts and concerns that the technology has yet to fully prove itself.

Instead government opted for a much smaller-scale deployment, testing the GM mosquitoes in combination with other suppression techniques in a $588,000 trial throughout 2018.

But in May of 2018  a cache of internal emails was released following an open records request. In those communications staff at a management level expressed serious doubts about the impact of the technology in controlling natural populations of the disease-spreading insects. They also expressed concerns about the claims being made on its behalf by British biotech firm Oxitec. The emails state that the report was generated by Oxitec which stood to gain from a deal of close to US $8 million dollar that would expand the project to entire island.

The Revealing and disturbing MRCU Oxitec Emails – Editorial

If it were not for the release of those emails, it seems likely that Oxitec’s claim that its program had led to a “62 percent suppression rate” of the disease-carrying Aedes aegypti population in the West Bay pilot area would have gone unchallenged by government officials. That may well have led to the awarding of a two-year, US$8 million contract to Oxitec based on, at best, incomplete data.

Instead, the government budgeted “only” $940,000 in 2018, essentially for Oxitec to rerun its pilot tests in West Bay from 2016 and 2017.

In November 2018 it was announced that the release of the GM mosquitoes has stopped and no new public funds are committed to the project next year.

It seems like this may be the final chapter in this GM Mosquito story in the Caymans.

https://www.caymancompass.com/2018/11/13/gm-mosquito-release-halted/

 

The next time you go to use a throw away plastic cup – think about where it could end up.

 

“It might take the monarchs as many as four to five generations to complete the journey all the way back up to Canada”

Monarch butterflies travel all the way to Dominica! Researchers from Canada say they take generations to do it!

Monarch Butterfly

Monarch Butterflies Migration Tracked Through Generations Across North America

August 07, 2013 – News Release

Everyone knows all about the epic breeding journey taken each year by generations of monarch butterflies between Mexico and Canada, right? Not so fast, say researchers including University of Guelph biologists.

Until now, linking adult butterflies and their birthplaces during a complicated annual migration spanning all of eastern North America and involving up to five generations of the iconic insects had eluded scientists.

Now for the first time, researchers have mapped that migration pattern across the continent over an entire breeding season. That information might help conserve a creature increasingly threatened by loss of habitat and food sources, says Tyler Flockhart, a PhD student in U of G’s Department of Integrative Biology.

“This tells us where individuals go and where they’re coming from,” he said.

Flockhart is lead author of a paper published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B with Prof. Ryan Norris and co-authors based in Saskatchewan, Colorado and Australia.

Their new study traced successive generations of adult monarchs to their birthplaces between the southern United States and Ontario over a single breeding season.

Before this, scientists had only a rough idea of those annual colonization patterns, said Prof. Ryan Norris, Integrative Biology. “You could have a monarch showing up in Ontario, but we didn’t know exactly where it came from.”

Tracking migration patterns is vital to understanding why monarch numbers are declining and predicting the effects on the insects of milkweed plant loss, habitat destruction and other factors, he said.

In 2012, the smallest-ever population of monarchs was recorded in their Mexican overwintering grounds. “They’ve been declining steadily,” said Flockhart.

Monarchs normally show up in southern Ontario by June or July. This summer, few had been sighted here by the end of July.

The researchers used chemical markers in butterfly wings to match “waves” of insect generations with their birthplaces. Monarch larvae eat only milkweed. The plant’s chemical signature varies from place to place, allowing scientists to pinpoint a butterfly’s birthplace by analyzing those chemical elements in its wings.

Flockhart spent summer 2011 following the northward migration and netting more than 800 monarchs for analysis. Beginning a road trip in southern Texas, he logged 35,000 kilometres across 17 states and two provinces. “As far as I know, it’s the broadest sample of monarch butterflies through an entire breeding season across North America.”

Monarch colonies overwinter in Mexico. During the breeding season beginning in April, successive generations were born in Texas and Oklahoma, then in the U.S. Midwest, and then over a broad area spanning the northeast coast and the Midwest.

One key stop is the “corn belt” in the U.S Midwest. There a breeding “explosion” sends vast numbers of adults in several directions, including to Canada, said Norris.

He said loss of milkweed plants and planting of genetically modified corn and soy in the Midwest have affected monarch survival. “If habitats in the Midwest continue to decline, then monarchs will lose the ability to expand the breeding range, including those butterflies that end up here in Ontario.”

It’s also important to protect breeding habitat in other locations, he said, including parts of southern Texas that supply future generations to breed in the Midwest.

“To lose monarchs would be a huge blow to the environment and to the public. People can easily identify monarchs. It might be the first butterfly they see or catch as a child, and it’s often the first story they hear about how animals migrate.”

Adds Flockhart: “Every school kid knows about monarchs.”

For more information:
Prof. Ryan Norris
University of Guelph
rnorris@uoguelph.ca

http://www.uoguelph.ca/news/2013/08/monarch_butterflies_migrations_tracked_generations.html

 

 

 

DSCF0502

Traditionally especially in tropical countries it is an accepted body care program to oil the body once or even twice a day. Usually it was coconut oil; made at home from coconuts growing in the area.

The benefits of this are many but one recent mind blowing study has shown a benefit most people do not think about.

Universities from Nebraska; Illinois; China and Brazil working in cooperation with The US Department of Agriculture have found that Coconut Oil is just as repellent as DEET.

DEET is an insect repellent that is used in products to prevent bites from insects such as mosquitoes, biting flies, fleas and small flying insects.

DEET has some serious side effects.

Manufacturers and governments still say it is safe to use but the people who use it a lot are disagreeing.

Children are affected the most as usual – The Canadian Government does not recommend using DEET on a daily basis for children younger than 12 years old for more than a month. For infants younger than 6 months old, they recommend not using it all.

The FDA does not recomend the use of DEET for children under 2 years old.

Mental retardation, muscular hypotonia, hearing loss, and coarctation of the aorta have been reported among infants whose mothers were exposed to DEET during pregnancy; however, a direct relationship between the use of DEET and birth defects has not been demonstrated.

They are still looking at the connections of the use of DEET to Gulf War Syndrome. US Veterans who used DEET-containing insect repellents showed signs of arthro-myo-neuropathy, a neurotoxic syndrome with symptoms including joint and muscle pain, fatigue after exertion, and tingling or numbing of the hands, arms, feet, and legs.

In 1982 workers at The National Everglades Park in Florida were concerned by the effects they were having from sustained use of DEET and they requested the National Park Service initiate a health hazard evaluation to evaluate occupational exposure to DEET among workers. It was found that more highly exposed workers had significantly higher prevalence of insomnia, muscle cramping, symptoms of mood disturbances,skin rash or blisters, and difficulty starting or stopping the urinary stream.

Until 1989, the standard-issue insect repellent used by the U. S. military contained 75% DEET, but concerns about its toxicity led to a search for new formulations. The 3M Company therefore developed a slow-release product containing only 35% DEET, which is the repellent currently used by military personnel

In the 1990’s a ban on any DEET product above 30% was put into place but it was negated by the courts and the companies who stood to make millions from the product.

The use of DEET has continued because vector-borne diseases account for 17% of all infectious diseases resulting in 700,000 human deaths annually. Repellents are a primary tool for reducing the impact of biting insects on humans and animals.

Universities have done multiple studies to find alternatives to DEET. Studies increased when they found mosquitoes were breeding immunity to the most powerful DEET concoction.

Lemon Eucalyptus is one natural product they found that compared to DEET in effectiveness but we will talk about that later.

In a cooperative study released in September 2018 that included U.S. Department of Agriculture, University of University of Kentucky, South China Agricultural University, Rutgers University, Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology and the Universidade Federal de Goiás of Brazil they found that fatty acids derived from coconut oil are inexpensive and highly efficacious repellant compounds.

What is mind blowing is these coconut fatty acids are active against a wide array of insects including biting flies, ticks, bed bugs AND mosquitoes. The medium-chain length fatty acids from C8:0 to C12:0 were found to exhibit the predominant repellent activity.

Repellency was stronger and with longer residual activity than that of DEET.

In laboratory bioassays, these fatty acids repelled biting flies and bed bugs for two weeks after application, and ticks for one week.

An aqueous starch-based formulation containing natural coconut fatty acids was also prepared and shown to protect pastured cattle from biting flies up to 96-hours in the hot summer, which, to their knowledge, is the longest protection provided by a natural repellent product studied to date.

This is huge.

There is already DEET in our waters and environment and repeated exposure seems to increase the side effects.

Science has shown we can use coconut based products instead.

March 2011 046

Most people who visit Dominica exclaim over and over how green it is!

Most of the people who live here say one of the reasons they put up with all the challenges of living on a small island with low incomes is the access to nature.

Lucky for me growing up my parents loved to immerse in nature; our most frequent family outing was an experience in nature; visiting a lake or a park for a day or a week holiday. I still remember the feelings of well being after being immersed in nature and the deep refreshing sleeps after.

01012015 001

Immersion in Nature is now scientifically proven to be healing!

I first learned this concept – nature is healing as part of a conscious lifestyle for health and wellness – in the 1980’s from the Rasta’s I studied during my year’s sabbatical in the West Indies studying Herbal Medicine; Appropriate Technology and Vegetarian Cooking!

Repeatedly as I interviewed people who were part of the Rasta Movement and interested in Healthy Conscious Living I heard that Immersion in Nature – gardening; hiking trails; nature walks; river baths; hot water soaks or visits to ‘Dr. Sea’ – was an intricate part of their Healthy Lifestyle.

Now Forest Bathing is offered everywhere.

The scientifically-proven benefits of exposure to nature include:

  • Boosted immune system functioning.
  • Reduced blood pressure.
  • Reduced stress.
  • Improved mood.
  • Increased ability to focus, even in children with ADHD.
  • Accelerated recovery from surgery or illness.
  • Increased energy level.
  • Improved sleep.

 

 

 

 

An upsetting video of a plastic straw being removed from the nostril of a sea turtle shows the grim reality of how plastic litter impacts marine life.

Straws are a fine example of the way we have been brainwashed into consuming. Since when did we need a straw to drink? Since companies started making them for profit! The drink does not stay cleaner or taste better.

Sometimes a small move can have huge effects. In my 20’s I decided to stop using straws. If you consider an average person uses at least 1 straw a day then throws it away – that means I have stopped with that 1 small move the release of 14,600 straws into the environment. I still have years left to continue this joyful move – clean up your environment – one small policy at a time.

I also saved 14,600 paper straw covers.

I have less BPA in my system from drinking liquids through a straw – BPA has all kinds of ramifications including obesity as this is one of the chemicals in our environment that causes the storage of unhealthy fat.

An upsetting video of a plastic straw being removed from the nostril of a sea turtle shows the grim reality of how plastic litter impacts marine life.

Ontario first in North America to curb bee-killing neonicotinoid pesticides

Farmers and the province have agreed to rules for reduction that begins July 1, while the manufacturer maintains the controversial insecticide is safe.

 

http://www.thestar.com/news/queenspark/2015/06/09/ontario-first-in-north-america-to-ban-bee-killing-neonicotinoid-pesticides.html

Unless you are eating 100% organic the answer is yes!

The chemicals we put on our gardens and farms are often organophosphates and they are neurotoxins very similar to nerve gas.

Chemical warfare was introduced to a shocked world during the First World War. The development of chemical warfare agents during the Second World War led to the so-called “nerve gases,” which are quick-acting poisons attacking the nervous system. In the second world war Nerve Gas was a feared and terrible weapon. I remember my grandfather telling stories of people who had come back from the war and described the experience: convulsions; seizures; confusion; irritation; anger; loss of memory and executive function.

As a Health and Wellness Consultant and Writer I have written many articles on studies showing the dangers of agricultural chemicals and I knew more than one study had shown links between agricultural chemicals and Parkinson’s Disease.

Over the years as I delved more deeply I found there were a lot of similar symptoms in many Dementias; Parkinson’s Disease and other Brain Diseases of today.

I asked a local doctor that I respect very much if he thought there could be a connection. He said he theorized from his many years of observations that older farmers he saw were functioning differently neurologically then those the same age with other jobs with less exposure to chemicals.

Symptoms of Parkinson’s
Physical Symptoms
Mental Symptoms

Symptoms of Dementia

At first I could not find any studies linking agricultural chemicals and dementia but years later they are starting to be published one by one and it is sad to think that we are doing this to ourselves for money.

Then I found a study in France that supported my friends theory

I was just blown away when I began to realize that a lot of the chemicals that we put on our food are “neurotoxins” very similar to the nerve gas of Chemical Warfare.

Researchers measured the levels of pesticide byproducts in the urine of 1,139 children from across the United States. Children with above-average levels of one common byproduct had roughly twice the odds of getting a diagnosis of ADHD, according to the study, which appears in the journal Pediatrics.

Recently it was projected that one in —- would have dementia over the age of 60;

According to the ‘Gulf War and Health published by the National Academies Press: “the persistent abnormalities seen in sarin victims that last long after the acute toxicity has resolved appear to be similar to the long-term neurobehavioral effects seen after acute intoxication from organophosphate pesticides (Delgado et al., 2004; London et al., 1998; Rosenstock et al., 1991; Savage et al., 1988; Steenland et al., 1994; Wesseling et al., 2002).

Organophosphate pesticides (as well as sarin and VX nerve agent) irreversibly inactivate acetylcholinesterase, which is essential to nerve function in insects, humans, and many other animals.

Meta-analysis was carried out by the University College of London to determine the neurotoxic effects of long-term exposure to low levels of organophosphates (OPs) in occupational settings.

It was released around the start of January 2013 and their conclusions are

The majority of well designed studies found a significant association between low-level exposure to OPs and impaired neurobehavioral function which is consistent, small to moderate in magnitude and concerned primarily with cognitive functions such as psychomotor speed, executive function, visuospatial ability, working and visual memory.

Listen to what this farmer has to say about the organophosphates they were forced to dip their sheep in.

 

Listen to this Organic Farmer’s observations on Mad Cow disease and neurotoxins.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MheeiX2w8JU

I love the name of this farm too.

Karen and Roy have never wavered from their dedication to farming organically and promoting organic farming within Dominica and the Caribbean.

They have an innovative way of marketing and selling their produce. They send out a weekly email describing what they have; you have time to peruse what’s available that week in the peace and quiet of your home/office; then you place your order by email at least 24 hours in advance. Then you pick it up at the Saturday market in Roseau. Their newsletters are informative and enjoyable to read.

You can just visit their booth at the Farmer’s Market Saturday morning if you wish but a few of their items are available only by email so always check to see if it is a request or special order item so you don’t get disappointed.

Roots Farm are there from about 6:30 AM to just after Noon.

Their table is right across from KFC on Hanover Street.

Note: there is a service charge of $5 for orders under $75.

The following is an example of their email newsletter.

THIS WEEK’S PRODUCE:

FRUITS & FRUIT TREES: Grapefruit, Red or White: 5/$2. For juice and fresh eating although still a little tart. Grapefruit helps control weight with flavonoids that block the uptake of fatty acids into cells, protects heart health with generous amounts of vitamin C, folic acid, potassium, and pectin, and helps protect against cancer. Pink and red varieties contain additional valuable anti-oxidants and red contains lycopene, a phytochemical that helps prevent the LDL cholesterol damage. Despite its own acidity, grapefruit has a beneficial alkalizing effect on the body. Cautions: grapefruit may halt the metabolism of some drugs, while excessive consumption can leach calcium from the body system, causing decay of the bones and teeth.

Strawberry Plants: in Flats: $10 each or 2 in same pot for $15. PLEASE REQUEST. These are a medium size real Northern type strawberry with very good real strawberry flavor. The type has been demonstrated to thrive and produce in higher elevations (Cochrane and Bellevue Chopin) in Dominica, but not tested, to my knowledge, along coast although the Taiwanese had a similar (same?) variety that did well in the Stock Farm area. Plants are vigorous producer of runners (more plants for you).

Tanmawen dezenn Seedlings: aka Tamawe de zen/Spanish Tamarind/Chinee tambran: (Vangueria madagascariensis): $20. PLEASE REQUEST. Well rooted, 2-2.5′ seedlings. Sweet, almost date like fruit, usually eaten dry in Dominica, although used fresh elsewhere. Grows as a profusely branched shrub or small tree, 2-15 m tall. Does best in drier parts of island. Species getting rare; deserves to survive: have room for a tree? ______________________________________________________________________

ROOTS

Turmeric aka “Saffwan”: 8 oz/$2.50. This celebrated health-boosting spice is not usually found organically grown and is easy to store for months. Mostly used dried, as in curry powder, fresh root tastes even better than dry grated into rice, beans, soups, etc. for color and warm, peppery flavor. Good grated into pesto or raw foods too. A true superfood, TCM and Ayurvedic Medicinal star known for strengthening and improving digestion, elimination and metabolism; supporting healthy liver function and detoxification; purifying blood; acting as an anti-inflammatory; containing curcuminoids that fight cancer, arthritis, and Alzheimer’s; and so much more. Note: surfaces (and hands) coming in contact with cut turmeric will get orange stains which eventually wear off. Also note that consuming with black pepper vastly increases the availability of turmeric’s healthful properties.

Yams, White & Lady’s: $2.50/lb Lady’s; $2/lb White. Limited supply. Yams provide some protein and a lot of starch, in the form of complex carbohydrates and soluble dietary fiber (which together are recommended as low glycemic index healthy food which also reduces constipation, decreases bad or “LDL” cholesterol levels, and helps prevent colon cancer). Yams also provide vitamin c and minerals.

VEGETABLES

Bean, Lima — fresh: $5/lb; $2.75/.5 lb. in shell (must be shelled before cooking); 7.5 oz/$6 shelled. Also called Butter Beans, fresh limas may just be the next best thing to edamame or fresh green peas. They also make an excellent hummus, replacing chickpeas. Cook lightly. Limas are a very good source of cholesterol-lowering, blood-sugar modulating fiber, making them an especially good choice for individuals with diabetes, insulin resistance or hypoglycemia. When combined with whole grains such as rice, lima beans provide virtually fat-free high quality protein. They are an excellent source of molybdenum and iron and can make a major contribution to heart and cardiovascular health due to their folate and magnesium content. Their manganese helps energy production and acts as an antioxidant to disable free radicals.

Bean, Lima — Dry: $9/lb. shelled. Limited supply Dry limas require long cooking like other dry beans, but similarly reward with flavor and nutrition. Limas are a very good source of cholesterol-lowering, blood-sugar modulating fiber, making them an especially good choice for individuals with diabetes, insulin resistance or hypoglycemia. When combined with whole grains such as rice, lima beans provide virtually fat-free high quality protein. They are an excellent source of molybdenum and iron and can make a major contribution to heart and cardiovascular health due to their folate and magnesium content. Their manganese helps energy production and acts as an antioxidant to disable free radicals.

Christophene/Chayote: 3/$2. Mild flavored and low calorie, christophene is most often served cooked but can also be enjoyed raw in salads. Skin and seed are also edible (as are leaves and roots). It is rich in amino acids, vitamins (especially Vitamin C and folate), antioxidants, minerals and fiber.

Edible “Hibiscus” (Hibiscus manihot, Bele or Abelmoschus manihot) – LEAVES: 10 oz/$2.50. Nice tasting, large highly nutritious leaves are mucilaginous, so are a good quick-cooking thickener for soups, but can also be steamed, stir-fried, or used as other greens. Bele makes the best ever “kale chips” (Wash & dry the leaves & spray or toss lightly with cooking oil, then sprinkle with salt & your choice of spices/herbs. Spread single layer onto baking pan and bake at 275-300 F about 10-15 minutes until crisp. Enjoy right away or store in air tight container to preserve crispness.) Also makes a great wrap, either raw or cooked, for your delectable fillings (see recipe at: http://www.ecobotanica.com.au/Stuffed-Vine-Leaves-Using-Edible-Hibiscus-Leaves-bgp1032.html), Among the most nutritious of greens, Bele is very high in vitamins A and C, in iron and protein. Used in numerous Asian healing systems to relieve inflammation, urinary infection, chronic bronchitis, pain and irritation. Its stems are antibacterial, anti-fungal, anti-viral. The bark is said to be emmenagogue, increasing menstruation and should be avoided by pregnant women. To be on safe side, perhaps leaves should be avoided as well by pregnant women. A paste of the bark is used to treat wounds and cuts; the root juice is warmed and applied to sprains; the juice of the flowers is used to treat chronic bronchitis and toothache; and the plant is thought to increase bone density.

Edible “Hibiscus” (aka Hibiscus manihot, Bele, Abelmoschus manihot) – STEMS: $1, 2 oz sample pack. PLEASE REQUEST. Lovely light-sweet flavor like nothing else I know, the stems are wonderful by themselves as a crunchy (but also slightly gooey) healthy snack or chopped into salads, soups, stir-fries; juiced into smoothies and green drinks; as crudités, etc. Lots of potential for creative use to capitalize on unique flavor. Older stems may need the outer layer peeled. Stems are antibacterial, anti-fungal, anti-viral. Please read cautions above for leaves.

Mustard Leaves: 50 cents/oz. Limited supply. Another of the cruciferous superstars (like kale & broccoli) whether used young and relatively mild or mature and strong flavored. Use fresh for pepping up your salad, sandwiches, omelets, or cooking. Mustard’s bite mellows somewhat when cooked. Mustard provides plentiful vitamins, minerals, fiber, detox & cardiovascular support, anti-oxidant & anti-inflammatory benefits. Folks with kidney and/or gallbladder problems should probably avoid due to oxalate content. Lots of good info at: www.whfoods.com

Pumpkin: $1.25/lb whole; VERY LARGE pumpkins. $2.00/lb. slices. Fully ripe & dry. Typical Dominican sweet delicious pumpkin delivers the vitamin benefits of both a fruit and a vegetable. Like other orange vegetables, pumpkin has high vitamin A content. It also has significant amounts of vitamin C, riboflavin, niacin, pantothenic acid, B-6 and folate and provides iron, potassium, calcium and magnesium.

Sweet Potato Greens: 10 oz/$2.50. Say what? Sweet potato leaves are delicious and nutritious and widely used in Africa and Asia. Steam, saute, add to soups and stews or cook like any quick-cooking green. According to FAO leaflet No. 13 – 1990, they are a good source of vitamins A, C, and B2 (riboflavin), and an excellent source of lutein. According to research from the University of Arkansas, sweet potato leaves are high in disease-fighting antioxidants, containing 15 different compounds helpful for preventing heart disease, diabetes, infection and some types of cancer.

HERBS

Basil: $2.50/Regular Mix; $3/any single variety or special mix. Protects cell structures as well as chromosomes from radiation and oxygen-based damage and provides protection against unwanted bacterial growth, including the ability to inhibit several species of pathogenic bacteria that have become resistant to commonly used antibiotic drugs. In addition, basil qualifies as an “anti-inflammatory” food that can provide important healing benefits along with symptomatic relief for individuals with inflammatory health problems like rheumatoid arthritis or inflammatory bowel conditions. Basil is a good source of nutrients essential for cardiovascular health, including Vitamin A and magnesium, as well as iron, calcium, potassium and vitamin C. As a member of the Mint family, basil is used for its digestive and anti-gas properties. Herbalists also recommend it for stomach cramps, vomiting, constipation, headaches, and anxiety. We have the following types available. Please let us know if you want us to bring a specific type for you.

Basil, Holy Green aka Tulsi: $3. Stars in Ayurvedic healing as: nerve tonic, stomach, heart and kidney strengthener, dengue preventive, and blood purifier as well as for stress, memory, fever, colds and flu, coughs, skin disorders, headaches, eye problems, hypertension, and much more. Lovely in a bouquet or for tea or cooking, but not really a culinary substitute for Italian/pesto basils. Recent fame as a Swine Flu deterrent/ameliorative. See: www.holy-basil.com

Basil, Holy Red: $3. PLEASE REQUEST. Like Holy Green Basil, but stronger tasting, Holy Red is a super herb medicinally: supports cortisol, blood sugar, protects cells from radiation damage, and so much more. Also lovely in a bouquet or for tea or cooking, but not really a substitute for Italian/pesto basils.

BASIL MIXES:

Basil Regular/Tea Mix: may include: Lemon, Thai, Malaysian, Holy Red, Holy Green (Tulsi), East Indian, Cinnamon/Mexican, Italian, Anise, various showy spicy purple basils, local (Spicy Globe) and more. May contain dark colors or stronger flavors than the Pesto or Southeast Asian mixes. Good for teas, but also for cooking or salad herbs. Basil protects cell structures as well as chromosomes from radiation and oxygen-based damage and against unwanted bacterial growth. In addition, it qualifies as an “anti-inflammatory” food that can provide important healing benefits along with symptomatic relief for individuals with inflammatory health problems like rheumatoid arthritis or inflammatory bowel conditions. Basil is a good source of nutrients essential for cardiovascular health, including Vitamin A and magnesium, as well as iron, calcium, potassium and vitamin C..

Basil, Pesto Mix: $3. Heavy on Italian, Thai, Malaysian, Lemon, Blue Spice & other varieties that make a great pesto and none of the stronger tasting (e.g., East Indian, Anise, Cinnamon) or red varieties. Do try substituting cooked breadnuts for pine nuts/almonds and coconut oil for olive oil for a wholly local version of pesto that equals or betters the traditional Italian. Purslane or papalo can be added to increase the nutritional value and add further depth to the taste. Basil,

SouthEast Asian Mix: $3. PLEASE REQUEST. Thai and Malaysian varieties. In SE Asian cooking, these are usually added at the very end of cooking to retain bright green color. Can also be used for pesto.

Bay Leaves: Fresh. PLEASE REQUEST. In addition to its culinary uses (soups, stews, sauces, etc.), Sweet bay is used medicinally as a tea to soothe the stomach and relieve flatulence and in ointments to relieve the aches and pains associated with rheumatism, and for sprains, bruises, and skin rashes. Do not use if pregnant or breast-feeding.or are scheduled for surgery in the next two weeks as it might cause excessive sedation combined with medications. Folk use: Cancer, dandruff, and relieving gas.

Chinese Garlic Chive aka Chinese Leek: Wonderful in and on most everything, raw or cooked (add at end of cooking for best flavor). Flavor like a mild garlic-onion cross. Low fat, high in fiber, Vitamin C and carotene, plus moderate calcium, Vitamins B1 and B2. In Chinese medicine, garlic chives are considered to be a yin or warming food that like other members of the garlic and onion family, contain a sulphur-rich mustard oil that aids digestion and helps promote the flow of blood.

Chive, Fine: PLEASE REQUEST. Limited supply. Used for delicate “onion” flavor, raw or cooked, and as a garnish. Chives aid digestion and stimulate appetite, are good for the respiratory system, help reduce the risk of prostate cancer, and have anti-inflammatory and antibiotic properties.

Culantro/Chadron Benee/Shado beni/Recao: By any name, this herb tastes like cilantro and is used similarly, as well as starring in Puerto Rican specialties like sofrito and salsas. Nutritionally, it offers calcium, iron, carotene, and riboflavin. Its medicinal value includes as a tea for pneumonia, flu, diabetes, constipation, depression, fevers, and blood purification. It is also used in chutneys as an appetite stimulant and is reported to have anti-convulsant properties and to help with vomiting and diarrhea. In addition to packages of leaves, we can supply the flower/seed scapes, the plant part most commonly used locally in tea, rum or food.

Dill: Limited supply. PLEASE REQUEST. Most commonly used in pickles, salads and fish dishes, dill has chemoprotective and bacteriostatic properties and is a very good source of calcium. Dill is also a good source of dietary fiber and the minerals manganese, iron and magnesium.

Lemon Balm: PLEASE REQUEST. Mint family herb useful in salad or for fish, also makes a lovely, almost flowery) tasting tea with antibacterial and antiviral properties (effective against herpes simplex) also useful as a mild sedative or calming agent. Try it in your own unique version of Mojito. Lemon balm should be avoided by those on thyroid medication as the herb may inhibit absorption.

Lemon Grass PLEASE REQUEST. With the bulb for Thai and other SE Asian (and other) recipes; leaves for tea. Grating the bulb or fine slicing it into whatever sauce, curry, stir-fry, etc. you are making gives a lovely flavor accent and benefits of the fiber and other nutrients, but the stalk and leaves could also be pounded or bruised and added to your pot for flavor and removed before serving. Lemongrass, ginger and garlic are wonderful as flavoring combo. for a winged bean stir-fry. See recipes at: recipes.epicurean.com. Lemongrass has many antioxidant, anti-tumor, antibacterial, and antifungal agents. It is used as a sedative/calming agent, to detoxify digestive organs, to stimulate digestion and blood circulation, and for hypertension.

Mints Mix Peppermint, Spearmint and a local (lovely, but unknown variety) mint. Culinary use in salads, mint jelly, tea, mojitos, more. Relieves many kinds of stomach distress, contains phytonutrients shown to stop growth of tumors, inhibits various bacteria and fungal growth, has anti-oxidant properties, helps airways stay free in asthma and colds, and provides nutrients like manganese, vitamin C and vitamin A, dietary fiber, folate, iron, magnesium, and calcium, vitamin B2, omega-3 fatty acids, potassium and copper. And we haven’t even mentioned mojitos yet.

Moringa Leaves, fresh (Dry also available): 2 oz/$3. Currently widely hyped but with good reason as Moringa is a powerful nutrient rich food, potent detoxifier, and therapeutic support for numerous health challenges and conditions. Loaded with vitamins and minerals, and protein with all 8 essential amino acids, plus others, and 46 anti-oxidants, it also tastes good (slightly spicy) fresh in salads, as garnish, in green drinks or lightly cooked addition to most anything. Moringa functions as an anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antiparasitic. It balances sugar and cholesterol levels, stimulates the immune system and metabolism, supports digestion and protects liver and kidneys. Caution: may not be appropriate for those taking blood-thinning medications and the seeds, powerful detoxicants, may cause problems with intestinal walls, kidney & liver if taken daily or in excessive amounts. Leaves can be utilized daily. See: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T3retnQVSOs&feature=share Click HERE for even more about Moringa.

Parsley, Italian Flat: A little milder and sweeter than curly parsley and used the same. Has similar anti-oxidant and anti-carcinogenic properties, benefits heart health and rheumatoid arthritis, and provides generous amounts of Vitamins K, C, A, and Folate, plus iron. Makes a great tabouleh.

Parsley, Japanese, aka Mitsuba: PLEASE REQUEST. Unique flavor, said to taste like angelica, celery, and parsley. All parts are edible, fresh or cooked in soups, salads, tempura batter, rice, as seasoning, etc. Cook lightly only as it can get bitter and lose taste if cooked for more than a few minutes. Offers Vitamins A, B’s, C, E and K, as well as minerals. Medicinally used for women’s complaints and in the treatment of hemorrhages, colds, and fevers.

Sage: Limited supply. PLEASE REQUEST. Culinary. American traditional favorite for poultry, stuffings. sausages, ground meats, fish, salads, soups, and stews. Also serves as an antispasmodic, antiseptic, astringent, diaphoretic, expectorant, nervine, and tonic. Small bunches.

Shimonita Scallions: 60 cents/oz, about $3-4/stem, depending on size. PLEASE REQUEST. Large Sweet Scallion variety from Japan: Very special. No waste: the green tops are delicious cooked in most everything. You’d be hard pressed to tell this from leeks by flavor, although texturally leeks are creamier after cooking. Like other scallions or “sive,” Shimonita has vitamin and mineral benefits (vitamin K, essential to blood clotting and strong bones; vitamin A, supporting eye health and cellular function; vitamin C with its antioxidant and many other virtues; folate, for energy production and birth defect prevention; Calcium, strengthening bones and teeth; Magnesium, which helps with muscle contraction, energy production and enzyme and protein activity; Potassium for regulating electrical activity, including heart beat, mineral and fluid balance; and manganese, a trace mineral that acts as an antioxidant. TCM uses scallions for dispersing chill and colds, relieving congestion, fighting fungal and bacterial infections, and relaxing muscle tension.

Soursop Leaves: PLEASE REQUEST. Fresh or dry. Lovely tasting tea is used for sleep inducing qualities and cancer prevention and cure. Scientific research conducted by The U.S. National Cancer Institute concluded that Soursop leaves can effectively attack and destroy cancer cells. In addition to this, folk uses include for: inflammation, rheumatism, diabetes, nerves, skin conditions (boils, eczema, etc.), liver, bladder & uric acid, and many more uses. Not for use by folks with low blood pressure or taking hypertensive drugs without proper monitoring of blood pressure.

Thyme, Broad Leaf aka Grosdite: aka Cuban oregano, Spanish Thyme. PLEASE REQUEST. Used for chicken, fish, meat, beans, pelau, risotto, as part of Jamaican “jerk” seasoning, and as part of green seasoning. Can be used in same ways as common thyme, but has stronger flavor, and is often used chopped fresh. Grosdite has antibacterial and fungicidal properties and is used for stomach complaints, fevers, colds, coughs, sore throats, infections, rheumatism and flatulence.

CHOCOLATE! CHOCOLATE BARS: $15/4oz or 110 gm bar. A not overly sweet treat made by Alan Napier at Pointe Baptiste estate in Calibishie. Bars may be ordered from the list below or you can take your chances at the table. Nearly all the cocoa used is grown organically either on the estate or bought from people who grow their cocoa organically. Currently we have the following varieties in stock: Coffee chocolate with organic Robusta coffee; 60% cocoa Dark chocolate with 80% cocoa Ginger chocolate with 60% cocoa Hot Pepper chocolate with 60% cocoa Milk chocolate with 50% cocoa — SOLD OUT Mint chocolate with 60% cocoa Spice chocolate with nutmeg, cinnamon and clove; 60% cocoa Tangerine chocolate with 60% cocoa

COCOA POWDER: SOLD OUT temporarily $5/100 gm packet. PLEASE REQUEST. This is 100% cocoa powder, derived after Alan presses the cocoa to extract the cocoa butter (which he then mixes with more cocoa to make chocolate. The cocoa powder is used for making cakes, cocoa tea, etc. In Europe it is sold in shops as Vanhouten cocoa powder. This is really beautiful delicious cocoa. For a special treat try these divine Chocolate Energy Balls: http://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-10534/raw-recipe-chocolate-energy-balls.html _________________________________________________________________________________

ORGANIC FERTILIZERS: $15/2 Kg Bag. PLEASE REQUEST. Imported from Belgium by W.M. Hollerman. (Holldom2@gmail.com, 316-2026) from whom larger size bags are also available. This is what we use, along with our own compost and pen manure (when we can get it uncontaminated with antibiotics or arsenic or other of the problematic additives to commercial feed passed through to the manure). We are very impressed with the results we get from this line of fertilizers. Three formulas are available:

VIVISOL: SOIL CONDITIONER/MICROBIAL STIMULATOR: Use in each planting hole, when planting new fields and also after sowing/incorporating young plants in the soil. Provides organic matter, improves physical and biological soil fertility, increases water retention capacity, improves soil structure. The stimulation of soil life will result in higher yields, especially for tropical fruit trees. Use 5-15 kg/100m2 or about one 8 oz cup per square meter or per 3.2×3.2 foot (10.7 square feet)

VIVIKALI — FRUITS, ROOTS, TUBERS, ORNAMENTALS: Slow, continuous release provides a lot of potassium and is best used 1.5 months before fruit formation to give a lot of energy to form big thick juicy fruits or root and tuber crops or for ornamentals not needing nitrogen. Apply 5-10 kg/100 m2 or about 4 oz. per square meter or per 3.2×3.2 foot (10.7 square feet)

PLANTORGANO — BASIC FERTILIZER, VEGETABLES: Good as an initial first fertilization or together with Vivisol in the planting hole or after sowing/planting. Apply 10-15 kg/100 m² or about one 8 oz cup per square meter or per 3.2×3.2 foot (10.7 square feet) (depending on the crop)